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Definition for word edited.

Accreditation Ac*cred`i*ta"tion, n. The act of accrediting; as, letters of accreditation., Bank Bank, n. [F. banque, It. banca, orig. bench, table, counter, of German origin, and akin to E. bench; cf. G. bank bench, OHG. banch. See Bench, and cf. Banco, Beach.] 1. An establishment for the custody, loan, exchange, or issue, of money, and for facilitating the transmission of funds by drafts or bills of exchange; an institution incorporated for performing one or more of such functions, or the stockholders (or their representatives, the directors), acting in their corporate capacity. 2. The building or office used for banking purposes. 3. A fund from deposits or contributions, to be used in transacting business; a joint stock or capital. [Obs.] Let it be no bank or common stock, but every man be master of his own money. --Bacon. 4. (Gaming) The sum of money or the checks which the dealer or banker has as a fund, from which to draw his stakes and pay his losses. 5. In certain games, as dominos, a fund of pieces from which the players are allowed to draw. Bank credit, a credit by which a person who has given the required security to a bank has liberty to draw to a certain extent agreed upon. Bank of deposit, a bank which receives money for safe keeping. Bank of issue, a bank which issues its own notes payable to bearer., Cash Cash, n. [F. caisse case, box, cash box, cash. See Case a box.] A place where money is kept, or where it is deposited and paid out; a money box. [Obs.] This bank is properly a general cash, where every man lodges his money. --Sir W. Temple. [pounds]20,000 are known to be in her cash. --Sir R. Winwood. 2. (Com.) (a) Ready money; especially, coin or specie; but also applied to bank notes, drafts, bonds, or any paper easily convertible into money. (b) Immediate or prompt payment in current funds; as, to sell goods for cash; to make a reduction in price for cash. Cash account (Bookkeeping), an account of money received, disbursed, and on hand. Cash boy, in large retail stores, a messenger who carries the money received by the salesman from customers to a cashier, and returns the proper change. [Colloq.] Cash credit, an account with a bank by which a person or house, having given security for repayment, draws at pleasure upon the bank to the extent of an amount agreed upon; -- called also bank credit and cash account. Cash sales, sales made for ready, money, in distinction from those on which credit is given; stocks sold, to be delivered on the day of transaction., Bloedite Bloe"dite, n. [From the chemist Bl["o]de.] (Min.) A hydrous sulphate of magnesium and sodium., 9. (Chem.) A unit of chemical attraction; as, oxygen has two bonds of affinity. It is often represented in graphic formul[ae] by a short line or dash. See Diagram of Benzene nucleus, and Valence. Arbitration bond. See under Arbitration. Bond crediter (Law), a creditor whose debt is secured by a bond. --Blackstone. Bond debt (Law), a debt contracted under the obligation of a bond. --Burrows. Bond (or lap) of a slate, the distance between the top of one slate and the bottom or drip of the second slate above, i. e., the space which is covered with three thicknesses; also, the distance between the nail of the under slate and the lower edge of the upper slate. Bond timber, timber worked into a wall to tie or strengthen it longitudinally. Syn: Chains; fetters; captivity; imprisonment., Cash Cash, n. [F. caisse case, box, cash box, cash. See Case a box.] A place where money is kept, or where it is deposited and paid out; a money box. [Obs.] This bank is properly a general cash, where every man lodges his money. --Sir W. Temple. [pounds]20,000 are known to be in her cash. --Sir R. Winwood. 2. (Com.) (a) Ready money; especially, coin or specie; but also applied to bank notes, drafts, bonds, or any paper easily convertible into money. (b) Immediate or prompt payment in current funds; as, to sell goods for cash; to make a reduction in price for cash. Cash account (Bookkeeping), an account of money received, disbursed, and on hand. Cash boy, in large retail stores, a messenger who carries the money received by the salesman from customers to a cashier, and returns the proper change. [Colloq.] Cash credit, an account with a bank by which a person or house, having given security for repayment, draws at pleasure upon the bank to the extent of an amount agreed upon; -- called also bank credit and cash account. Cash sales, sales made for ready, money, in distinction from those on which credit is given; stocks sold, to be delivered on the day of transaction., Confidential Con`fi*den"tial, a. [Cf. F. confidentiel.] 1. Enjoying, or treated with, confidence; trusted in; trustworthy; as, a confidential servant or clerk. 2. Communicated in confidence; secret. ``Confidential messages.' --Burke. Confidential communication (Law) See Privileged communication, under Privileged. Confidential creditors, those whose claims are of such a character that they are entitled to be paid before other creditors. Confidential debts, debts incurred for borrowed money, and regarded as having a claim to be paid before other debts. --McElrath., Credit Cred"it (kr[e^]d"[i^]t), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Credited; p. pr. & vb. n. Crediting.] 1. To confide in the truth of; to give credence to; to put trust in; to believe. How shall they credit A poor unlearned virgin? --Shak. 2. To bring honor or repute upon; to do credit to; to raise the estimation of. You credit the church as much by your government as you did the school formerly by your wit. --South. 3. (Bookkeeping) To enter upon the credit side of an account; to give credit for; as, to credit the amount paid; to set to the credit of; as, to credit a man with the interest paid on a bond. To credit with, to give credit for; to assign as justly due to any one. Crove, Helmholtz, and Meyer, are more than any others to be credited with the clear enunciation of this doctrine. --Newman., Creditableness Cred"it*a*ble*ness, n. The quality of being creditable., Creditably Cred"it*a*bly (-?-bl?), adv. In a creditable manner; reputably; with credit., Credit Cred"it (kr[e^]d"[i^]t), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Credited; p. pr. & vb. n. Crediting.] 1. To confide in the truth of; to give credence to; to put trust in; to believe. How shall they credit A poor unlearned virgin? --Shak. 2. To bring honor or repute upon; to do credit to; to raise the estimation of. You credit the church as much by your government as you did the school formerly by your wit. --South. 3. (Bookkeeping) To enter upon the credit side of an account; to give credit for; as, to credit the amount paid; to set to the credit of; as, to credit a man with the interest paid on a bond. To credit with, to give credit for; to assign as justly due to any one. Crove, Helmholtz, and Meyer, are more than any others to be credited with the clear enunciation of this doctrine. --Newman., Credit Cred"it (kr[e^]d"[i^]t), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Credited; p. pr. & vb. n. Crediting.] 1. To confide in the truth of; to give credence to; to put trust in; to believe. How shall they credit A poor unlearned virgin? --Shak. 2. To bring honor or repute upon; to do credit to; to raise the estimation of. You credit the church as much by your government as you did the school formerly by your wit. --South. 3. (Bookkeeping) To enter upon the credit side of an account; to give credit for; as, to credit the amount paid; to set to the credit of; as, to credit a man with the interest paid on a bond. To credit with, to give credit for; to assign as justly due to any one. Crove, Helmholtz, and Meyer, are more than any others to be credited with the clear enunciation of this doctrine. --Newman., Creditor Cred"it*or (kr?d"?t-?r), n. [L.: cf. F. cr?diteur. See Credit.] 1. One who credits, believes, or trusts. The easy creditors of novelties. --Daniel. 2. One who gives credit in business matters; hence, one to whom money is due; -- correlative to debtor. Creditors have better memories than debtors. --Franklin., Creditress Cred"it*ress (kr?d"?t-r?s), Creditrix Cred"i*trix (kr?d"?-tr?ks), n. [L. creditrix.] A female creditor., Creditress Cred"it*ress (kr?d"?t-r?s), Creditrix Cred"i*trix (kr?d"?-tr?ks), n. [L. creditrix.] A female creditor., Dedition De*di"tion, n. [L. deditio, fr. dedere to give away, surrender; de- + dare to give.] The act of yielding; surrender. [R.] --Sir M. Hale., Discreditable Dis*cred"it*a*ble, a. Not creditable; injurious to reputation; disgraceful; disreputable. -- Dis*cred"it*a*bly, adv., Discreditable Dis*cred"it*a*ble, a. Not creditable; injurious to reputation; disgraceful; disreputable. -- Dis*cred"it*a*bly, adv., Discreditor Dis*cred"it*or, n. One who discredits., Editioner E*di`tion*er, n. An editor. [Obs.], Editorial Ed`i*to"ri*al, a. Of or pertaining to an editor; written or sanctioned by an editor; as, editorial labors; editorial remarks., Editorial Ed`i*to"ri*al, n. A leading article in a newspaper or magazine; an editorial article; an article published as an expression of the views of the editor., Editorially Ed`i*to"ri*al*ly, adv. In the manner or character of an editor or of an editorial article., Editorship Ed"i*tor*ship, n. The office or charge of an editor; care and superintendence of a publication., Editress Ed"i*tress, n. A female editor., Edituate E*dit"u*ate, v. t. [LL. aedituatus, p. p. of aedituare, fr. L. aedituus a temple warden; aedes building, temple + tueri to guard.] To guard as a churchwarden does. [Obs.] --J. Gregory., Exchange editor Ex*change" ed"i*tor An editor who inspects, and culls from, periodicals, or exchanges, for his own publication., Exhereditation Ex`he*red`i*ta"tion, n. [LL. exhereditare, exhereditatum, disinherit.] A disinheriting; disherison. [R.] --E. Waterhouse., Expeditate Ex*ped"i*tate, v. t. [LL. expeditatus, p. p. of expeditare to expeditate; ex out + pes, pedis, foot.] (Eng. Forest Laws) To deprive of the claws or the balls of the fore feet; as, to expeditate a dog that he may not chase deer., Expedite Ex"pe*dite, a. [L. expeditus, p. p. of expedire to free one caught by the foot, to extricate, set free, bring forward, make ready; ex out + pes, prdis, t. See Foot.] 1. Free of impediment; unimpeded. To make the way plain and expedite. --Hooker. 2. Expeditious; quick; speedily; prompt. Nimble and expedite . . . in its operation. --Tollotson. Speech is a very short and expedite way of conveying their thoughts. --Locke.


Explination we found from Wikipedia for edited.

- edit (born edward ma) is an electronic music producer and dj based in los angeles , california . he is a member of the glitch mob
- edit may refer to: editing , the process of correcting or revising text, images, or sound. edit (application), a simple text editor for the
- the editing process can involve correction, condensation, organization, and other modifications performed with an intention of producing a
- film editing is part of the creative post-production process of filmmaking . the term film editing is derived from the traditional
- in the recording studio environment, a sound engineer records, edits, manipulates, mixes, or masters sound by technical means in order to
- an editor-in-chief (editorial head) is a publication's primary head, having final responsibility for all the operations and policies he or
- the term video editing can refer to: linear video editing , using video tape non-linear editing system (nle), using computers with video
- in music, a radio edit is a modification to make a song more suitable for airplay, whether it be adjusted for length, profanity , subject
- photo manipulation (also called photoshopping or—before the rise of photoshop software—airbrushing) is the application of image editing
- date may 2012 a level editor (also known as a map, campaign or scenario editor) is a software tool used to design levels, maps, campaigns


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